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Wellbody Recipe: Kid-approved Swiss Chard and Chickpea Fritters

Warm and satisfying, creamy yet light, these fritters are so yummy, it's hard to believe they're also so healthy. swisschard2

Packed with fiber-rich chickpeas and succulent Swiss chard (a low-calorie source of antioxidant vitamins and minerals), the recipe takes less than 15 minutes to make. Kids love these melt-in-your-mouth patties. Whip up a double batch and pack leftovers for lunch the next day! They'd also make a substantial appetizer.

 

Swiss Chard and Chickpea Fritters

(from Real Simple with some Wellbody suggestions)

Ingredients
• 8 cups stemmed and torn Swiss chard (about 1 bunch) or spinach
• 1 15.5-ounce can chickpeas, rinsed
• 1 clove garlic, chopped
• 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
• kosher salt and black pepper
• 2 ounces Feta, crumbled (about 1/2 cup) or ½ cup Swiss and gruyere cheeses, grated
• 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
• 4 tablespoons olive oil
• 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt
• hot sauce, for serving (Apple sauce is terrific for dipping, too!)

Directions
1. In a food processor, combine the Swiss chard, chickpeas, garlic, cumin, ½ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper and pulse until finely chopped, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary. Transfer to a large bowl, add the cheese and flour, and mix until combined. Form the mixture into eight 2½-inch patties.
2. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Working in 2 batches, cook the patties until browned, 3 to 4 minutes per side, adding the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil to the skillet for the second batch. Serve with the yogurt, applesauce and/or hot sauce.

Comments

  • Guest
    Rachael Saturday, 06 July 2013

    I had such high hopes for this recipe. Did not have right texture at all. My son did not like it. I added rice and ended up cooking it as a casserole so I wouldn't waste food.

  • Guest
    Professor Wellbody Tuesday, 09 July 2013

    Hi Rachael,
    So sorry this didn't work for you! It's so frustrating when recipes don't turn out. This one happens to be a staff favorite, so we've made it several times. Was the texture issue because the batter/dough was too wet? (I'm assuming your had a gloppy batter because you added rice.) The batter/dough should have the consistency of burger meat. If it was too wet, maybe try drying the Swiss chard leaves? Or checking to make sure you didn't put the oil or yogurt into the batter? (The oil is for frying and the yogurt is meant to be used as a dipping sauce on the side.) Good luck if you decide to try the recipe again. Let us know how it goes.
    Warm regards from Paula and the Wellbody Team

  • Guest
    Kathy Saturday, 17 August 2013

    I just tried this, and had the same issue as Rachel (7/6/13). I did not add the oil or greek yogurt to the dough, so that is not the issue. The dough was much much too wet -- when I tried to form it into patties, I could not. I tried adding a little chickpea flour, but couldn't make the dough into something nearing "ground meat like". So, I dolloped the dough into the frying pan. The result was not something that could be picked up and eaten like a fritter. I think the issue must be in the proportion of chard to chickpea. I suspect that when you say 8 cups of chard, you do not mean shredded and packed into the cup, but loosely packed into the cup. I packed it densely, and this probably added too much liquid to the mix.

  • Guest
    Andrea Mulholland Sunday, 14 July 2013

    I served this tonight to my family and my 6 year old loved them! He liked his with the Greek yogurt, my 4 year old, husband and myself liked them with the applesauce. Will definitely be making these again!
    Thanks!
    Andrea

  • Guest
    Kathy Saturday, 17 August 2013

    I just tried this, and had the same issue as Rachel (7/6/13). The dough was much much too wet -- when I tried to form it into patties, I could not. I tried adding a little chickpea flour, but couldn't make the dough into something nearing "ground meat like". So, I dolloped the dough into the frying pan. The result was not something that could be picked up and eaten like a fritter. I think the issue must be in the proportion of chard to chickpea. I suspect that when you say 8 cups of chard, you do not mean shredded and packed into the cup, but loosely packed into the cup. I packed it densely, and this probably added too much liquid to the mix.

  • Guest
    Kathy Saturday, 17 August 2013

    I just tried this, and had the same issue as Rachel (7/6/13). The dough was much much too wet -- when I tried to form it into patties, I could not. I tried adding a little chickpea flour, but couldn't make the dough into something nearing "ground meat like". So, I dolloped the dough into the frying pan. The result was not something that could be picked up and eaten like a fritter. I think the issue must be in the proportion of chard to chickpea. I suspect that when you say 8 cups of chard, you do not mean shredded and packed into the cup, but loosely packed into the cup. I packed it densely, and this probably added too much liquid to the mix.

  • Guest
    Kathy Saturday, 17 August 2013

    I just tried this, and had the same issue as Rachel (7/6/13). The dough was much much too wet -- when I tried to form it into patties, I could not. I tried adding a little chickpea flour, but couldn't make the dough into something nearing "ground meat like". So, I dolloped the dough into the frying pan. The result was not something that could be picked up and eaten like a fritter. I think the issue must be in the proportion of chard to chickpea. I suspect that when you say 8 cups of chard, you do not mean shredded and packed into the cup, but loosely packed into the cup. I packed it densely, and this probably added too much liquid to the mix.

  • Guest
    Kathy Saturday, 17 August 2013

    I just tried this, and had the same issue as Rachel (7/6/13). I did not add the oil or greek yogurt to the dough, so that is not the issue. The dough was much much too wet -- when I tried to form it into patties, I could not. I tried adding a little chickpea flour, but couldn't make the dough into something nearing "ground meat like". So, I dolloped the dough into the frying pan. The result was not something that could be picked up and eaten like a fritter. I think the issue must be in the proportion of chard to chickpea. I suspect that when you say 8 cups of chard, you do not mean shredded and packed into the cup, but loosely packed into the cup. I packed it densely, and this probably added too much liquid to the mix.

  • Guest
    Smithe829 Thursday, 14 August 2014

    This is why Facebook games are becoming more popular. The ease of use and dissemination of content, tagging kbkgedeegfkekdbe

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Guest Monday, 22 September 2014